In-depth reviews

Porsche Panamera review - MPG and running costs

Quite surprisingly, the 4 E-Hybrid isn’t always the most economical of the Panamera range

Evo rating
  • Huge performance from Turbo models; infallible build quality; Porsche-like precision to the controls
  • Expensive; hybrids add unwanted mass and complexity to already big and heavy packages

Panameras are always inherently big and heavy cars, which means even in hybrid form they use an alarming amount of premium unleaded. The numbers don’t look any more enticing under new WLTP regulations either, with all Panameras having experienced a sharp drop in claimed MPG on the new cycle. Entry-level Panamera 4s have a (best) claimed figure of 26.9mpg, which is a solid drop on before, but is still better than the 25.9 the Panamera S is able to muster.

The V8 GTS and Turbo models are, as one might expect, even worse off, with best case 23.5mpg and 23mpg ratings. Sport Turismo models have a slightly worse rating again by about 0.4mpg, depending on the model.

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But while the new WLTP testing standard certainly doesn’t help with the standard petrol Panameras’ figures, it plays right into the hands of the two E-Hybrid models that, like all plug-in hybrids, tend to have significantly higher figures on paper than is actually achievable on the road, unless your daily commute mimics the testing procedure. So, despite having 300kg extra weight compared to the Panamera S, the E-hybrid which shares its combustion engine is rated at 85.6mpg on the combined cycle – and the 671bhp Turbo S E-hybrid? That’s 80.7mpg.

Drive these models for more than around 30 miles though and you’ll see those figures drop well into the teens, especially on the near 2.5-ton Turbo S E-Hybrid. That said, if your commute is largely town-based, and you have consistent access to charging, and keep the Panamera in its more eco-friendly modes, the hybrid systems do in fact work well to keep fuel use to a minimum. Briefly.

Aside from fuel, running costs are set to be high, even by Porsche standards. For this you can thank the outright size of the components. Wheels, tyres, brakes, oil – any consumable really that the Porsche can chew through, so it will quickly.

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