Skoda Superb review - the best large family car to drive? - Interior and tech

Hot hatch powertrains and talented chassis makes latest Superb better than ever to drive

Evo rating
Price
from £19,060
  • Styling, body control and broad engine range
  • Still not a true drivers' car

Ask us to describe the Superb’s interior design from memory and we’d struggle. But what the cabin lacks in architectural excitement is makes up for in quality of build, logical minor control placement and general comfort.

In effect, it feels like a larger, more sumptuous Octavia, which is in turn a step above the Rapid, and so-on until you reach the Citigo. Skoda’s interiors are as consistent in design as their exteriors, but it’s churlish to really complain about something that works so well. Your touch points, the wheel, gear selector and seats, are all neatly-trimmed and pleasant to interact with, and everything else is clear, logical and solidly constructed.

Subscribe to evo magazine

Subscribe today to have every issue of evo delivered straight to you. You'll SAVE 39% on the shop price, and get evo for its original cover price for a whole year!

The new Superb is based on an extended version of the VW Group MQB platform. The car is some 28mm longer, 47mm wider and 6mm taller than the old model, and benefits from the VW Group’s Dynamic Chassis Control (DCC) technology – a first for Skoda.

Weight has also been saved – the new car is as much as 75kg lighter, with the lightest 1.4-litre model now weighing 1375kg. 23 kilos have been saved thanks to the extensive use of high strength steel in the body shell - 46 per cent of the structure is made up of the stuff.

Another key factor to note is the new car’s improved aerodynamic efficiency. Drag coefficient is rated at 0.275, which betters the likes of the Volkswagen CC and its 0.284, for example.

The Superb also benefits from a raft of safety tech, including auto-braking functions, tyre pressure monitoring systems and seven airbags. Adaptive cruise control is joined by lane assist, traffic jam assist and crew protect assist – which tightens belts and closes windows ahead of a collision – as well as Emergency Assist, which can automatically bring the vehicle to a standstill if the driver is unable to.

Most Popular

Aston Martin DB4: review, history and specs
Aston Martin

Aston Martin DB4: review, history and specs

1959 was a watershed year for Aston Martin. As the DBR1 swept all before it on the track, the first customers were taking deliveries of the all-new DB…
11 Oct 2020
SSC Tuatara hypercar hits 331mph, making it the world’s fastest production car
News

SSC Tuatara hypercar hits 331mph, making it the world’s fastest production car

Over a decade after SSC last entered the record books, its Tuatara has claimed the title of world’s fastest production car
19 Oct 2020
Hot Cupra Formentor spied testing – with a five-cylinder warble
Cupra

Hot Cupra Formentor spied testing – with a five-cylinder warble

Is Cupra about to get hold of Audi’s brilliant five-cylinder petrol engine?
19 Oct 2020
Alpine to become high-performance Renault offshoot
Alpine

Alpine to become high-performance Renault offshoot

Heated-up Renaults but no A110 replacement for Alpine as it follows in Cupra and Abarth footsteps
21 Oct 2020