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KTM X-Bow GT-XR revealed as 493bhp road-legal GT2 car

KTM has road-legalised its X-Bow GT2 racer to take on the BAC Mono R and Radical Rapture

KTM has revealed the X-Bow GT-XR in full, a road-legal take on its track-only GT2 car. Following its announcement of the project in January, the Austrian firm has successfully converted its all-out racer to comply with EU homologation rules, resulting in the €284,900 (c£250,000) X-Bow GT-XR.

Just like the GT2 car, the GT-XR features an Audi-derived 2.5-litre turbocharged five-cylinder, detuned from the racer by 107bhp and 102lb ft for an output of 493bhp and 429lb ft of torque. Drive is sent to the rear wheels via a seven-speed dual-clutch gearbox (DSG), as opposed to a six-speed sequential, with a mechanical differential also included. Its 1250kg (wet) weight figure allows for an impressive 3.4sec 0-62mph time and 174mph top speed.

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> Radical Rapture 2022 review – 478bhp/ton road racer tested

This low weight figure is achieved primarily through the use of a carbonfibre monocoque, providing optimum rigidity, weight and strength. KTM says safety was the highest priority for this car, and so it’s included the same ‘jet fighter’ style canopy as the GT2 car, capable of withstanding six times its own weight in the event of a crash. It also has a neat party trick, being able to open remotely via the key fob.

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The new model might be very closely based on the GT2 car, but KTM has managed to include a number of amenities to make longer drives on public roads a more comfortable affair. Inside, there are carbonfibre bucket seats with four-point harnesses, a removable steering wheel with an integrated LED display, air conditioning, a rear-view camera system, inductive charging for phones, USB-C ports and even bluetooth audio.

KTM has designed the GT-XR with road trips in mind too, including a 160-litre storage compartment and a large 96-litre fuel tank. Given the 2.5-litre capacity five-cylinder engine is inherently pretty fuel-efficient in its applications in heavier Audi models such as the RS3 , KTM says it’s capable of covering over 600 miles on a single tank. 

The most notable visual change over the GT2 car is the removal of its large rear wing, with a low-profile unit now in its place. KTM has also fettled its overall aerodynamic package to create an ‘AirCurtain’ ground effect, with the front splitter, suspension, floor section and diffuser working together to increase downforce.

KTM offers a choice of high performance steel or carbon ceramic brake options. Opt for steel and you’ll get 365mm front discs and 8-piston calipers, with the carbon ceramic discs 380mm in diameter with 6-piston items, the rear setup features four-piston calipers and 356mm discs regardless of the material.

The KTM X-Bow GT-XR isn’t strictly limited in terms of production, but the firm says it has almost sold out for the 2023 model year. Prices start from €284,900 (c£250,000) before tax.

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