Mini Cooper S review – ride and handling

Sharp steering and a nimble chassis make the Cooper S fun to chuck around, but it’s not as finely tuned as some alternatives

Evo rating
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from £19,555
  • Fun to throw around, well built, distinctive inside and out
  • Not as focused as some, uninspiring engine, limited practicality

Minis have long been towards the top of the class for agility and fun. That remains unchanged with the current model, though it’s not without fault. That it remains one of the more entertaining hot hatches in this class on a twisty road is as much to do with the current paucity of rivals as it is the car’s inherent talents.

Things the Mini does well include steering response, agility, body control and a general sense of being ‘up for it’ it’s the kind of car that, if it were to serve as your first taste of a hot hatch, would probably snare you as a hot hatch buyer for life.

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It’s fun to drive at a brisk pace, feeling responsive and engaging and offering enough performance to punch hard out of corners, and good balance that offers some rotation without feeling edgy. With a compact body and good visibility it also feels at home on Britain’s B-roads in a way some larger hatches do not.

What it lacks is the same sense of focus that you get in something such as a Ford Fiesta ST, which feels perhaps less accessible initially but has a higher level of ability to match your own confidence and ability. We know the chassis is capable if given the right parts the limited-run Mini Challenge demonstrated that but as standard, a Cooper S doesn’t go as far as some. And while the steering is quick, it’s almost cynically darty, while it’s also a little short on off-centre feedback.

On the plus side, it’s among the more mature hatches, so ride and refinement are pretty good. The ride can feel a little bouncy over some surfaces, but in general it isolates you from the road surface and has enough control not to feel out of its depth on more challenging roads.

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