2019 Range Rover Evoque review – ride and handling

2019 Range Rover Evoque review

Ride and Handling

Compared to the previous model the biggest improvement with the new Evoque is the ride quality, body control and responsiveness of the chassis. No longer does it lethargically roll into corners, thud along road surfaces and generally plod around like a sulky teenager without a data connection.

Subscribe to evo magazine

If you're passionate about the world's greatest performance cars, experience the thrill of driving with evo magazine. Try your first 5 issues for £5.

Where there was previously a sense of disconnect and a one-dimensional approach to how the Evoque drove, it now drives with a consistency and a voice that brings a new character to the experience. It no longer has an iron-fisted approach to dynamics, rather the new Evoque flows along a road rather than tumbling down it and hoping for the best. The steering is quite light, and perhaps not as accurate as that found in a Q3 or X1, but it’s far more responsive than before, and suits that laid-back character.

On a section of road where you would least expect a crossover to impress – a fast, flowing mountain road with high-speed corners with inconsistent cambers, dips and crests – the Evoque delivers more than our expectations were prepared for, but that might just be more of a reflection on the previous model. It remains calm, quick and a more competent SUV than before, but its real forte is making unfussed, gentle progress.

Advertisement
Advertisement - Article continues below

The ride quality is susceptible to a slight pogo-like movement – blame that on the short wheelbase and high centre of gravity. At lower speeds it is pleasantly free of the brittle and crashy ride that so often affects cars in this class, but where the secondary ride is well suppressed, the primary ride never quite settles, even at motorway speeds.

Off-road it’s lost none of its Land Rover DNA, but you do wonder if a less complex, and perhaps lighter four-wheel-drive system could be employed considering the urban environment Land Rover knows the Evoque will inhabit.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Most Popular

Visit/alfa-romeo/21322/alfa-romeo-to-launch-new-700bhp-8c-and-600bhp-gtv-coupe
Alfa Romeo

Alfa Romeo culls sports car programme in wake of FCA merger

Italian’s future performance models killed off in favour of more profitable SUVs
11 Nov 2019
Visit/caterham/201924/caterham-620r-v-ariel-atom-35-v-elemental-rp1
Caterham

Caterham 620R v Ariel Atom 3.5 v Elemental Rp1

Flight Club - lightweight track day toys with heavyweight powertrains, Steve Sutcliffe compares them on track at Anglesey circuit in Wales
5 Nov 2019
Visit/toyota/yaris/201932/toyota-yaris-gr-4-hot-hatchback-teased-successor-to-the-grmn-and-a-true-wrc
Toyota Yaris

Toyota Yaris GR-4 hot hatchback teased – successor to the GRMN and a true WRC homologation special

Gazoo Racing to follow up its 2019 WRC championship with an all-new car based on the GR-4 hot hatch
6 Nov 2019
Visit/hyundai/i30-n-hatchback/201775/hyundai-i30-n-versus-hyundai-i30-tcr
Hyundai i30 N hatchback

Hyundai i30 N versus Hyundai i30 TCR

Can Dickie Meaden beat Steve Sutcliffe in a straight(ish) race? We sent them to the Circuit Nuvolari with a pair of Hyundai i30 Ns to find out.
20 Sep 2019