In-depth reviews

BMW X7 review – MPG and running costs

More than just an X5 XL, the X7 adds luxury, a little more space and a satisfying driving experience

Evo rating
Price
from £72,195
  • Space, quality, strong engine range, still drives like a BMW
  • A large car to live with, looks divide opinion

BMW quotes an WLTP figure of 32.8-33.6mpg for the xDrive30d, and that tallies with the real-world experience during our test. Urban running doesn’t allow the X7 to really get into its stride and make the most of the tall eighth ratio, even though there is generous torque, but a steady cruise gives more opportunity to eke out the miles.

The optional Active Cruise Control has more finesse than some systems and will avoid heavy braking and acceleration unless absolutely necessary, helping to boost the range of approximately 480 miles on a long motorway journey. M Performance models are typically thirstier, with the M50d generally floating around 26-28mpg on in mixed driving, while the M50i will struggle to keep to the right side of 20mpg in anything other than gentle motorway driving. 

Other running costs associated are also bound to be steep, with huge wheel and tyre sizes both in diameter and widths, while other consumables like brake discs and pads will also take a hammering. Are you sure you really need those two extra seats?

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