Porsche 911 991.2 (2015-2019) review - Interior and technology

The half-century lineage has had its ups and downs, but there’s never been a class act quite like the 911

Evo rating
Price
from £79,000
  • The planet’s most complete sports car
  • Lacks a little of the old charisma

Interior and technology

Some things never change. The 911’s signature five-dial instrument layout featuring a large, centrally mounted rev-counter survives to this day. Not much else does, though. The cabin pretty much adheres to Porsche slick ‘family design’ with top-notch materials and impeccable build quality, though more recent introductions in the Porsche range, such as the Panamera, do date the 911's button-festooned dashboard.

The low-slung driving position is beautifully judged and extremely comfortable, visibility in the coupe is excellent and the major controls are perfectly sited. Most of the robust-feeling switchgear is arranged along the wide centre stack, while the standard touchscreen infotainment system is intuitive to use and features clear graphics.

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Thanks to the 100mm-longer wheelbase, the 991 is roomier inside than the earlier 997 version. The rear seats offer space for two kids and double up as extra luggage space. The deep 135-litre front boot is a handy size, too. Elsewhere in the cabin there’s a decent-sized glovebox and a couple of handy cup-holders hidden underneath a flap ahead of the front seat passenger. The door bins are a bit mean, though, and the cubby between the driver and passenger only has enough room for a modestly dimensioned smartphone. The 911 Cabriolet is surprisingly practical for a soft top.

The Targa version has a complex and fascinating roof mechanism that looks like a CGI sequence from a Transformers movie as it does its stuff, but Porsche uses the standard-fit parking sensors to ensure it’s not going to hit anything as it moves. Having that old-style wraparound rear screen means that visibility out the back is as good as the coupe’s and significantly better than the Cabriolet’s.

Porsche introduced its fourth-generation communications system in the revised 991 model, which is a useful improvement over the old version in terms of functionality and usability. It also introduced a rotary switch on the steering wheel to allow the driver to choose between Normal, Sport, Sport Plus and a customisable Individual mode. Within that switch is a Sport Response button, which primes the entire drivetrain for maximum response and performance for 20 seconds to aid overtaking. 

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