In-depth reviews

Audi TT RS review - coupe refreshed after an emissions-enforced hiatus - Interior and tech

The Audi TT RS has always appealed by virtue of its excellent powertrain, the very bit that’s been messed with in this mid-cycle update

Evo rating
Price
from £52,450
  • Devastatingly quick, sounds great
  • Adjustability is not the TT RS’s thing

Interior and tech

If there were to be a template for how sports car interiors should all look in the future, this would probably be it. The RS builds on the already excellent TT, itself a beacon of minimalist design and exceptional build quality.

Despite the pared-back nature of the new TT RS’s interior, it’s chock-full of brilliant detailing and little features that make you realise that Audi really thought about the cabin in a different way to most other manufacturers. The first thing that strikes you is the three propeller-inspired air vents, then look closer and you realise that they also feature the controllers for the entire HVAC system, having twist knobs that also function as temperature and fan displays. This unconventional and minimalist layout takes a little getting used to – the heated seat button is easy to miss (it’s within the outer-most air vent) and directing airflow isn’t intuitive (you have to rotate the outer bezel until you feel it pointing in the desired direction) – but once you’re familiar with it you’ll find other climate and heater controls terribly old fashioned.

Subscribe to evo magazine

Subscribe today to have every issue of evo delivered straight to you. You'll SAVE 39% on the shop price, and get evo for its original cover price for a whole year!

The steering wheel is taken from the Audi R8 supercar, but with the shrunken steering wheel boss and red starter button it looks like it could have come straight off a concept car. The other new button controls the ‘drive select’ function, allowing the driver to alter the behaviour of the car via the 12.3-inch Virtual Cockpit.

Speaking of which, Audi’s revolutionary driver information system is the only infotainment screen in the TT and as such is less superfluous than in other Audi models fitted with the same virtual cockpit. This leaves the interior free of ugly displays and unnecessary buttons. The basics are just so right in the TT, there is no need for anything more.

Despite having what Audi calls back seats, in usual TT fashion they are only suitable for very small children or extra luggage. Boot space is generous for the class, and if you fold the second seat row you're left with an oddly shaped, but still usable cargo area.

Most Popular

Visit/bmw/m3-saloon/20529/all-new-bmw-m3-competition-revealed-an-icon-reborn
BMW M3 saloon

All-new BMW M3 Competition revealed – an icon reborn

This is the all-new BMW M3 Competition saloon which will join the M4 Competition coupe in BMW M’s new M3/4 family
23 Sep 2020
Visit/honda/civic-type-r/203112/honda-civic-type-r-gt-2020-review-still-king-of-the-hot-hatch-crop
Honda Civic Type-R hatchback

Honda Civic Type R GT 2020 review – still king of the hot hatch crop?

Subtle tweaks have made the Type R an even more formidable hot hatch, but we’re keen to try one again soon to understand fully the changes to the susp…
22 Sep 2020
Visit/bmw/m4/22869/all-new-bmw-m4-competition-revealed-next-generation-super-coupe-debuts
BMW M4

All-new BMW M4 Competition revealed – next generation super coupe debuts

The new BMW M4 Competition applies its war paint, but there’s no manual coming to the UK
23 Sep 2020
Visit/hyundai/202950/updated-hyundai-i30-n-revealed-with-optional-dual-clutch-box
Hyundai i30 N

Updated Hyundai i30 N revealed with optional dual-clutch ‘box

It was the hot hatch that upset the status quo, and now the i30 N is back with more power and tech
24 Sep 2020