In-depth reviews

Audi TT RS review - coupe refreshed after an emissions-enforced hiatus - mpg and running costs

The Audi TT RS has always appealed by virtue of its excellent powertrain, the very bit that’s been messed with in this mid-cycle update

Evo rating
Price
from £52,450
  • Devastatingly quick, sounds great
  • Adjustability is not the TT RS’s thing

MPG and running costs

Taken at face value, the Audi TT RS is surprisingly efficient for a car that can hit 62mph in under four seconds. Claimed economy figures are 30.7mpg and 181g/km on the new WLTP cycle – not brilliant for an engine of this size, but impressive considering the performance that is accessible. Audi will only be bringing a limited number of TT RSs into the UK in 2019 so residuals should be strong, although don't expect to be able to hang on to as much value as you would with some limited-build Porsches or BMWs.

There’s one big drawback with the TT RS’s economy, however. In reality you cannot drive the TT RS in such a manner as to produce such large mpg figures. With the noise the engine makes, and with such easily accessible rapid acceleration, you can’t help but prod that throttle pedal to enjoy both attributes. On anything other than a long motorway run, if you can achieve an mpg figure north of 20 you have better self-restraint than we do.

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By comparison, the Porsche 718 Cayman S will officially hit up to 38.7mpg on the combined cycle, but considering the Porsche's weight advantage and smaller, less powerful four-cylinder engine, the gap is not quite as big as you would think. The bigger, heavier BMW M2 averages 33.2mpg combined, although thanks to the BMW's lower purchase price and rock-solid residuals, it should be an easier proposition to try to justify.

Being an Audi and not something with a more exotic badge, servicing and other running costs should be reasonable compared to those of the Porsche 718, but the highly tuned and bespoke nature of the power plant will make it a more expensive proposition against more humble TT variants.

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