Skip advert
Advertisement

F87 BMW M2 (2015-2021) review ­– engine and gearbox

The last of its generation, the M2 is a throwback to a golden age of small, rear-wheel-drive performance models from Munich

Evo rating
  • Controllable, well balanced chassis, cracking engine
  • Ride can still get agitated, standard brakes suffer on track

Early non-Competition M2's made do with the engine from the old M235i, albeit with a smattering of M3 and M4 components as well as a few bespoke parts. To gain some extra power over the M235i, the old M2 had a larger intercooler and used the pistons and forged crankshaft from the M3/4. It also had a modified sump, to help cope with the higher g-forces on track. In many ways it was the weak link in the M2’s otherwise impressive strong chain, denying the car true M car status. However, that all changed with the Competition and CS, which picked up the same S55 twin-turbocharged unit as the M3 and M4.

At 365bhp, the original M2 it sat in the middle, in terms of power, between the period M240i with 335bhp and the F80/F82 M3/4's 425bhp. The engine’s behaviour slotted into the same hierarchy, too; it wasn’t as brutal as the M3 and M4’s ‘six and it didn’t chase round to the red line in such an aggressive and enthusiastic manner. However it was smoother, more linear and more predictable, while still being wilder than the conventional motor in the M240i.

Advertisement - Article continues below

The Competition and CS featured more of the good stuff though, with 404bhp and 444bhp respectively from the 'real' S55 engine under the bonnet. The CS's output is derived directly from the previous M4 Competition, and feels even more potent here thanks to the shorter wheelbase and lower kerb weight. 

There are two gearboxes available on the M2 CS and Competitions: a six-speed manual and a seven-speed dual-clutch transmission. The contrast between the two is marked, while the manual allows complete involvement and further access to the manageable handling, the DCT feels like a blunt instrument. In Sport and Sport Plus driving modes, the semi-auto hammers each gear home with such force the rear tyres can barely cope. At full throttle, as one clutch re-engages the drivetrain the rear wheels jolt causing the car to wiggle from the back. The extra ratio seems unnecessary too; the torquey six-cylinder is more than capable with just six gears.

Skip advert
Advertisement
Skip advert
Advertisement

Most Popular

Porsche Taycan Turbo GT Weissach Package review: two seats, 1020bhp and £186,300
Porsche Taycan Turbo GT – front
Review

Porsche Taycan Turbo GT Weissach Package review: two seats, 1020bhp and £186,300

We’ve driven the new, record-breaking Taycan Turbo GT – it’s astonishing in some ways but confusing in others
10 Apr 2024
Used car deals of the week
Main used car deals
Advice

Used car deals of the week

In this week's used car deals, we've sourced everything from a Mk1 Ford Focus RS to a Porsche Taycan
12 Apr 2024
Hyundai i30 N Fast Fleet test – 8 months with the Korean hot hatch
Hyundai i30 N evo Fast Fleet
Long term tests

Hyundai i30 N Fast Fleet test – 8 months with the Korean hot hatch

The i30 N has been one of our favourite hot hatches ever since we first sampled it. It passed the long-term test with flying colours, too
9 Apr 2024