Skoda Octavia vRS 230 review - most powerful vRS ever

Fastest Skoda vRS ever tops the range and is the Octavia to go for

Evo rating
Price
from £26,150
  • Differential increases sharpness, standard equipment makes the model even more of a bargain
  • Power upgrade undetectable, performance gains miniscule

Skoda’s most powerful vRS car to date, and its fastest too, the Octavia vRS 230 joins the current Octavia line-up and sits at the top of the tree, with an additional 10bhp over the standard petrol vRS. It’s also equipped with an electro-mechanical limited-slip diff and will be available as a hatch or estate with either a six-speed manual or DSG gearbox. 

The 2-litre turbocharged four-cylinder engine now produces 227bhp (up from 217bhp) 200rpm higher in the rev range, from 4700rpm through to 6200rpm. Torque remains at 258lb ft, although it’s available for longer, from 1500 through to 4600rpm. 

Subscribe to evo magazine

If you're passionate about the world's greatest performance cars, experience the thrill of driving with evo magazine. Try your first 5 issues for £5.

Performance has improved, but you’ll need a sensitive backside to feel the 0.1sec drop in 0-62mph time (now 6.7sec for the manual, 6.8sec for the DSG hatch models and 6.8sec and 7.0sec for the respective estate variants). There’s also a 1mph increase in top speed, to a limited 155mph, for the hatch, and 153mph and 152mph for the estate with a manual or DSG gearbox respectively. The vRS 230 also gets an electronically controlled mechanical limited-slip differential as standard.

The chassis is the same as the regular vRS’s, with the hatch sitting 12mm lower and the estate 13mm lower than a regular Octavia. Nineteen-inch ‘Xtreme’ alloy wheels are standard fit and wear a 225/35 tyre.

Advertisement
Advertisement - Article continues below

Externally the vRS 230 is distinguished by black door mirrors and front grille, standard xenon headlights, a black gloss finish to the exhaust tips and ‘Sunset’ rear glass; estate models also get black roof rails. Inside, electric heated leather sports seats are standard as are an Amundsen touchscreen satnav system, an auto-dimming rear-view mirror and park assist.

Prices for the new vRS 230 start at £26,150 for a manual hatch, rising to £28,540 for a DSG-equipped estate: a £2520 increase over all standard vRS models. The vRS 230 is the equivalent to the Performance Pack offered on Volkswagen Golf GTI.

Technical highlights

The electronically controlled mechanical diff is the highlight of the car. A multi-plate clutch unit, it can deliver up to 100 per cent of the engine’s torque to the front wheel with the most grip and traction. Two settings are available – Normal and Sport – that can be switched via the vRS Mode button on the centre console. 

The diff is largely the same unit you will find in the Volkswagen Golf R’s Haldex clutch four-wheel-drive system, but without the additional driveshafts. The clutches close when the forces build and torque needs to be distributed between the front wheels. As well as providing greater traction and control through a corner, the diff is also designed to improve stability under acceleration on wet or low-grip surfaces. The standard ESC and traction control systems can only be partially switched off.

The 2-litre turbocharged engine gains its 10bhp increase through an ECU remap and a new sports exhaust system that includes new front and rear silencers and a reduction in back pressure. 

While the chassis and brakes remain the same as on the standard vRS (as does the electro-mechanical power steering), the larger standard wheel and tyre combination provide an increased tyre foot print and, consequently, more grip. The combination of the diff, the remap and more mechanical grip has resulted in the vRS 230 being around ten seconds a lap quicker over the 12.94-mile lap of a certain German race circuit.

What’s it like to drive?

On the track (Skoda chose to only have a track driving element for the vRS 230’s international launch), the power advantage is undetectable, but the manual gearbox certainly gets the best from the power unit, which pulls strongly with no turbo-lag to speak of. The shifts of the optional DSG are just too slow, the ’box being particularly tardy to react on downshifts, often leaving you in the wrong gear as you turn in, or changing down as you’re about to clip an apex. 

Advertisement - Article continues below

In the slower corners of the circuit the diff does an admirable job of supressing understeer, but ultimately the inside driven wheel can still be felt spinning up as the outer tyre begins to be overwhelmed as you open the throttle.

However, in faster, third and fourth gear corners, the vRS 230 can be hustled into a turn and will resolutely hold its line, running to corner exit with a more controlled and measured attitude than the standard car. The natural push you’d expect from a front-driven chassis (Skoda hasn’t eliminated understeer, despite its claims) is more linear and progressive than in a car without a diff, allowing you to feed in the throttle as the nose passes the apex, which allows for a clean and quick exit. The 230 is no track car though, and we’ll have to wait a week or two until we get to drive an example on the road before we can draw a firm conclusion. 

For now, however, if you were about to order a vRS, we’d spend the extra and opt for a vRS 230. The cost of adding the 230’s standard Sunset glass, electrical and heated sports seats, touchscreen satnav and park assist to a regular vRS would push the price up by £2450, which makes the £2520 premium the 230 commands look a bit of bargain. Especially when you consider that it also includes the larger wheels, an engine upgrade, and a new exhaust and diff. 

Advertisement

Recommended

Visit/toyota/yaris/201932/toyota-yaris-gr-4-hot-hatchback-teased-successor-to-the-grmn-and-a-true-wrc
Toyota Yaris

Toyota Yaris GR-4 hot hatchback teased – successor to the GRMN and a true WRC homologation special

6 Nov 2019
Visit/audi/r8/201931/entry-level-audi-r8-v10-rwd-added-to-the-range
Audi R8

Entry-level Audi R8 V10 RWD added to the range

6 Nov 2019
Visit/bmw/m2/201929/track-only-bmw-m2-cs-racing-unveiled
BMW M2

Track-only BMW M2 CS Racing unveiled 

6 Nov 2019
Visit/volvo/v90
Volvo V90 estate

2019 Volvo V90 T6 R-design review - the great estate?

5 Nov 2019
Advertisement

Most Popular

Visit/alfa-romeo/21322/alfa-romeo-to-launch-new-700bhp-8c-and-600bhp-gtv-coupe
Alfa Romeo

Alfa Romeo culls sports car programme in wake of FCA merger

Italian’s future performance models killed off in favour of more profitable SUVs
11 Nov 2019
Visit/caterham/201924/caterham-620r-v-ariel-atom-35-v-elemental-rp1
Caterham

Caterham 620R v Ariel Atom 3.5 v Elemental Rp1

Flight Club - lightweight track day toys with heavyweight powertrains, Steve Sutcliffe compares them on track at Anglesey circuit in Wales
5 Nov 2019
Visit/maserati/granturismo/201792/maserati-granturismo-zeda-run-out-model-revealed
Maserati GranTurismo

Maserati GranTurismo Zéda run-out model revealed

It’s out with the old, in with the new as the final GranTurismo paves the way for Maserati’s ambitious electrified future
12 Nov 2019
Visit/hyundai/i30-n-hatchback/201775/hyundai-i30-n-versus-hyundai-i30-tcr
Hyundai i30 N hatchback

Hyundai i30 N versus Hyundai i30 TCR

Can Dickie Meaden beat Steve Sutcliffe in a straight(ish) race? We sent them to the Circuit Nuvolari with a pair of Hyundai i30 Ns to find out.
20 Sep 2019