Aston Martin Vantage review – performance and 0-60 time

Traction can be an issue off the line, but once rolling the Aston punches hard

Evo rating
Price
from £120,900
  • Dominating powertrain; balanced and playful chassis
  • Can feel bulky and sometimes unwieldy; doesn’t engage like the best in class

As you’d expect, the Vantage is a lively performer, with the 0-62mph dash delivered in 3.6sec (over a second quicker than the old car), while top speed is a heady 195mph (the Roadster’s acceleration time is equally impressive – just two-tenths slower to 62mph, and going on to a 190mph top speed with the fabric roof in place). That said, in reality it can’t quite match those acceleration times unless the tarmac is both dead dry and warm, thanks to an inherent traction issue. However, once rolling the Aston gathers speed with real intent, the tidal wave of torque catapulting the car up the road.

It may not be as rabidly quick as a Porsche 911 Turbo, but it’s not far behind. The tweaks to the ECU have also resulted in a more linear delivery, so despite the breaks in traction it doesn’t feel as if the unit is dumping all its torque on the road in the same way an AMG does. The Coupe F1 Edition, despite its subtle power advantage, has identical figures on paper to those of the standard Coupe, with the Roadster F1 achieving the 0-62mph dash in 3.7sec and sharing the standard Roadster’s 190mph top speed.

> Click here for our review of the Mercedes-AMG GT R

The transmission is best in its standard setting, where it responds crisply to the column-mounted paddles and shifts ratios smoothly and quickly. The sportier settings deliver fractionally quicker changes, but the rather abrupt shifts aren’t worth the trade-off. That said, when left to its own devices it’s surprisingly responsive in Sport+, slipping down ratios for corners and holding on to revs for maximum acceleration. F1 Edition cars have a slicker calibration than the standard cars, with less of a jolt to full-bore upshifts in the most aggressive modes.

Arguably the best part of the engine is the noise. It sounds a little subdued in Sport, but switch to Sport+ or Race and the V8’s sonic potential is uncorked. The changes to induction and exhaust deliver a richer, more cultured soundtrack than the bombastic NASCAR bellow you get with this engine in a Mercedes. There’s a pleasant burble at idle that builds to a crackling roar at the red line that’s pure Aston Martin. The noise is all the more remarkable when you consider the oddly small pea-shooter tailpipes of the standard exhaust. The Sports Exhaust option unlocks even more volume and theatrics, but the era of dumping unburnt fuel into the exhaust manifold for the sake of a few pops and bangs feels a little out of touch with the times.

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