Skip advert
Advertisement

Range Rover Sport P510e 2023 review

The smaller Rangie is now available with a 503bhp hybrid powertrain. Still want that V8?

Evo rating
Price
from £112,040
  • Hybrid powertrain provides a genuine benefit; luxury
  • Feels big and heavy because it is

A petrol engine in a car weighing 2.7 tons sounds like a recipe for financial ruin and an unhealthy relationship with fuel station staff. And a lot of Twix Xtras. But we live in a world where batteries command more budget resource than internal combustion engines as an industry races to fit a plug socket to as many of its cars as possible. Including Range Rover, which has done just so with its Sport P510e. 

Advertisement - Article continues below

Its battery is a 38.2kWh item, which in a vehicle a quarter of the size would make for a decent EV city car, but in one weighing perilously close to 3000kg results in a claimed 69 miles of electric driving, after which you’re calling upon the 400+ mile potential range of its 3-litre, turbocharged straight-six engine. Combined the two deliver 503bhp and 516lb ft of torque. 

> Land Rover Defender SVR spied

Healthy numbers in a saloon car, less so in an SUV. But while the P510e doesn’t have the get-up-and-go of the 4.4-litre V8 Sport, it doesn’t leave you languishing. What the battery pack adds in kilos, the motor it powers compensates for with an instant slug of torque before the straight-six steps in. With its eight-speed auto delivering almost seamless shifts, the Sport PHEV avoids the rough edges of the diesel model Range Rover also offers – still the only choice for those who cover mammoth miles on a regular basis, tow heavy loads frequently and/or have an aversion to fuel station forecourts – and delivers just enough performance that many might question the need to go for the V8. 

Skip advert
Advertisement
Advertisement - Article continues below

Plug in at home and you’ll need around five hours on a 7kW charger to get a full battery, which with a brimmed tank of petrol gives a healthy combined range of around 500 miles. In cold weather during our test the electric-only range remained in the low 60s with the battery fully charged. Precise calibration means the Sport will run on electric power as frequently and as often as possible, and neither is its pace glacial when running silently. It’s another example of a plug-in hybrid providing a solution to the many who want to reduce their reliance on petrol without having to commit to the uncertainty of running an EV. 

It’s not, by the very nature of what it’s designed to do, a car you’re going to leap out of bed to go for a drive in when the sparrows begin their morning routine. However, if your needs require a car of this type the latest Sport adds the luxury of the current Range Rover without its gargantuan size. Yes, it’s still a vast car to position on the road and there’s little to feel through any of the controls, but it rides with a pliancy and level of comfort that’s often lost in such cars to unyielding unsprung masses and air-suspension systems straining at their limits to keep body and occupants composed. But Range Rover has overcome these issues by an impressive margin.

Cars such as the Range Rover Sport are not either/or cars. You don’t pick one over a 911 Carrera GTS; chances are you have both – or a Caterham that needs towing and a family that demands space and near unrivalled luxury, in which case these are tasks the P510e completes with aplomb. Although we’d still opt for the V8 and a grab bag of cheese & onion to go with that Twix.

Range Rover Sport P510e specs

EngineStraight-six, 2996cc, turbocharged, plus electric motor
Power503bhp
Torque516lb ft
Weight2735kg (187bhp/ton)
0-62mph5.4sec
Top speed150mph
Basic price£112,040

This story was first featured in evo issue 309.

Skip advert
Advertisement
Skip advert
Advertisement

Most Popular

Lotus Elise S2 v Toyota MR2 Mk3 v Porsche Boxster S 987: The best affordable mid-engined sports cars
Used mid-engined bargains
Group tests

Lotus Elise S2 v Toyota MR2 Mk3 v Porsche Boxster S 987: The best affordable mid-engined sports cars

Everyone should own a mid-engined car at least once in their life, and the S2 Elise, Mk3 MR2 and 987 Boxster S are brilliant places to start
15 Jun 2024
McLaren Artura Spider 2024 review – Ferrari 296 rival just got a whole lot better
McLaren Artura Spider
Reviews

McLaren Artura Spider 2024 review – Ferrari 296 rival just got a whole lot better

More power, comprehensive chassis updates and a new Spider model has resulted in McLaren’s Artura being impossible to ignore for those in the junior s…
16 Jun 2024
Ferrari F430 v Lamborghini Gallardo v McLaren 650S v Audi R8: The best used mid-engined supercars
Affordable mid engined exotics
Group tests

Ferrari F430 v Lamborghini Gallardo v McLaren 650S v Audi R8: The best used mid-engined supercars

For most of us, owning a mid-engined supercar is the ultimate. And because of the numbers built in the last 20 years, the dream is more attainable tha…
16 Jun 2024