Porsche 911 review - Engine, gearbox and technical details

The latest Porsche 911 is more complete than ever, but it takes time to discover its character

Evo rating
  • An immaculately polished machine
  • Lacks character unless wrung out

Excluding the GT3 RS and Speedster, both of which are based on the previous 991 platform, there are currently two distinct 911 variants, the Carrera and Carrera S, which are then multiplied by all-wheel-drive and Cabriolet versions. As such, there are currently only two basic engine options in the 911 range, and pending the imminent introduction of a seven-speed manual on the Carrera S, just the one transmission.

Those two engines are the Carrera’s 3-litre twin-turbocharged flat-six with 380bhp and 332lb ft, and the Carrera S’s 3-litre twin-turbocharged flat-six with 444bhp and 391lb ft. The latter figures, for reference, are very similar to the output produced by the old 991 Carrera GTS (and comfortably above the 996 Turbo’s – how times have changed).

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Carrera 4 and Carrera 4S models use all-wheel drive, but all 992s currently use an eight-speed PDK dual-clutch gearbox, controlled as ever by a pair of paddles behind the steering wheel and via a new and curiously small transmission selector on the centre tunnel.

The 992s also feature petrol particulate filters in the exhaust system for the first time, helping to meet Euro 6 emissions regulations, but elsewhere it’s business as usual: suspension is by MacPherson struts up front with a multi-link rear axle, and the rack and pinion steering is electrically assisted. The wheel and tyre set-up is staggered: 19 and 20 inches on the Carrera, 20 and 21 on the Carrera S.

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The 992’s structure though is more aluminium-intensive this time around. Only 30 per cent of the shell is now steel, and the main body pressing is aluminium. There’s only one body shape, in contrast to previous 911s, which means two-wheel-drive models are now the same width as all-wheel-drive cars. The two-wheel-drive Carrera weighs in at 1505kg, the Carrera S 10kg more, all-wheel-drive models another 50kg, and Cabriolets an additional 70kg.

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