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In-depth reviews

Lamborghini Huracan (2014-2019) review

Exciting, exotic and eccentric, the Huracan appeals on character as much as talent

Evo rating
  • V10 powertrain, balance, driver involvement
  • Lacks the handling finesse seen elsewhere in the class

The Lamborghini Huracán may be the entry-level Lamborghini, but its naturally aspirated V10 engine and edgy handling characteristics make sure this is no simple branding exercise. The mid-engined supercar may share its aluminium/carbonfibre chassis, engine and gearbox with the Audi R8, but its Italian heritage is clear to see and feel, the Huracán exuding a more flamboyant and aggressive character than the ice-cool Audi.

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First released in 2014, the Huracán is now beginning to diversify, initially launched solely in coupe form with all-wheel drive, it is now available in rear-wheel drive or Spyder options (or both) if you so wish. Also on its way is a new high performance Lamborghini Huracán Performantè model, boasting more power, less weight and a contentious Nurburgring lap record.

Lamborghini Huracan: in detail

  • Performance and 0-62mph time > Unimpeachable grip, a double clutch gearbox and powerful V10 make short work of the 0-62mph time. The rear drive LP 580-2 will hit it in 3.6 seconds, while the all-wheel drive LP 610-4 drops this to 3.2 seconds.
  • Engine and gearbox > All versions of the Huracán use the same 5.2-litre naturally aspirated V10 engine. Outputs vary based on the model, but they all utilise the same brilliant dual-clutch gearbox.
  • Ride and Handling > The Huracán has never had the same level of limit adjustability as most rear wheel drive rivals. The rear drive LP 580-2 does its best to encourage Ferrari 488 style power-slides, but in the context of the new McLaren 720S, the Lamborghini has a tough task to stay competitive.
  • MPG and running costs > Not Lamborghini’s forte, fuel consumption is rated at 19.6mpg on a combined cycle in the most efficient LP 580-2 spec, so fuel costs are bound to be high. CO2 is 283g/km putting it firmly in the top bracket.
  • Interior and tech > Boasting Lamborghini’s own version of Audi’s virtual cockpit, the pared back interior is rife with ergonomic issues, although it does still look the part. 
  • Design > The sleek, almost simple lines of this entry-level Lamborghini look more dramatic in real life than in pictures. The Performantè has more extreme aero and the first widespread usage of ‘forged carbon’ composites.  

Prices, specs and rivals: 

Kicking off at around £160,000 for the entry-level rear-wheel drive LP 580-2, the Huracan is priced at around £25k more than the closely related Audi R8 V10 Plus, a car that has more standard equipment, power and standard carbon ceramic brakes. At this price point, the Lamborghini trades on its brand cache to objectively make itself a viable rival to other supercars like the McLaren 570S and Porsche 911 Turbo S.

An extra £25,000 will net you the more powerful LP 610-4, but at this price point the rivals like the Ferrari 488 GTB and upcoming McLaren 720S make their presence felt. Here the Ferrari and McLaren start to outclass the Huracán, although it does have the unique selling point of being the only atmospherically powered supercar left (bar its Audi R8 cousin).

Convertible versions of both rear and all-wheel drive Huracán models are available for an extra £20k or so, each with folding fabric roofs. Again, though, this roof arrangement appears inferior to the folding hardtop option of the 488 Spider.

Appealing to the more track-focused buyer, Lamborghini recently revealed the wild looking Performantè to up the performance ante. With an extra 30bhp and 40kg less to lug around, the stripped out model promises to sharpen up the Huracán driving experience with help from new age active aerodynamics.

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