Lamborghini Murcielago

I'd been intending to start by prattling on about the fact that it had taken five months to become confident of the Murci's handling. But no. It's as well to remember that there is a huge lump of a V12 behind your ears - push it too hard and the laws of physics will take over without warning. This was demonstrated recently (thankfully at Bruntingthorpe) when a sweeping left-hander taken in third at 85mph provoked a violent spin which left me seeing the front of a following Ariel Atom at least four times. Do

I'd been intending to start by prattling on about the fact that it had taken five months to become confident of the Murci's handling. But no. It's as well to remember that there is a huge lump of a V12 behind your ears - push it too hard and the laws of physics will take over without warning. This was demonstrated recently (thankfully at Bruntingthorpe) when a sweeping left-hander taken in third at 85mph provoked a violent spin which left me seeing the front of a following Ariel Atom at least four times. Doh! It was a greasy surface and the tyres were almost down to their wear indicators, but the Lambo stayed on track. I'm certainly going to take it easier for a bit. The distinct power bands at 4200 and 6000rpm that rocket the Lambo forward can also threaten to break its traction, and it takes a bit of getting used to. SG54 has been out most days, including in the snow, and thanks to its 4wd it makes short work of the white stuff just as long as you use the right foot gingerly and keep below 3000rpm. It's been perversely amusing parking it at the pumps next to the Cayennes and X5s plastered with slush. A good jet wash underneath before bedtime is all that's needed to bring it back to tip-top condition. For a supercar it's also got a huge boot, and the staff at the local Morrison's are well used to seeing it parked outside in the larger places reserved for mothers and babies (with their permission, of course). So anybody who says you can't use a supercar everyday is plain wrong, as long as you can cope with being pointed at and stared at. I do intend to draw the line at fitting it with a towbar though. It's been another month (and hopefully the final one) in which the plastic has taken a huge bashing. Next big expenditure was the 7500-mile service. The Lambo is chain-driven, which means no huge belt-changing costs, but labour rates are still gigantic (currently £110 per hour), and the first proper service - basically just filters and fluid changes plus a brake clean - cost £1128.28. A faulty door catch and an inoperative fuel gauge (not good for a V12 that does an average 10mpg) were the only other problems - both covered by the warranty. I also got one of the most thorough valets ever, including every chip touched up, thanks to the superb Lamborghini Manchester. The Tubi exhaust seems to be getting even louder. It sets off at least five car alarms every time it enters the only multi-storey that will take it in Leeds. It doesn't seem to be the loudness itself but the depth of the note that causes the security staff to come running out of their kiosk. Fortunately, on the road, together with the gear whine and the rising and falling of the chain-driven cams, it makes for a beautifully intoxicating sound from the inside. Interestingly, I'm told that out of the eight Murciélagos delivered in September 2004 the vast majority haven't yet been in for their 1500-mile service, let alone the next one! I was intending to give the Murci a well-earned rest in January, but that's already gone out of the window. And, with another French trip in the offing at Easter (accompanying an Enzo and other prancing horses) and Le Mans in June, I suspect I'm going to need another credit card for a new clutch next.

Running Costs

Date acquiredSeptember 2004
Total mileage7522
Costs this month£1128.28 (service)
Mileage this month2670
MPG this month9

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